Famous Sayings #187 — ‘Those Who Make Peaceful Revolution Impossible …’

June 19, 2020

Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.

Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, make violent revolution inevitable, John F Kennedy, JFK, Alliance for Progress, United States, Latin America, protest, violence
President John F. Kennedy made remarks in the White House State Dining Room on the one-year anniversary of the Alliance for Progress. Taken via screenshot. (Video)

I have been thinking about this quote often and it was on my mind even before the start of 2020 and the events that have sparked this period of justifiable protest. What do I think about this quote? Of course, the answer will come after the explanation of what this quote means and why it was first uttered.


Who First Said, ‘Those Who Make Peaceful Revolution Impossible …’

Anyone who uses this quote will tell you that John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States, first uttered this line, but they usually don’t tell you when. President Kennedy said this during a speech he made in the State Dining Room of the White House on March 13, 1962 (Wade). Kennedy was addressing Latin American diplomats and discussing the first anniversary of the Alliance for Progress.

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To Protect and Serve [Repost]

to protect and serve, law enforcement
Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

This post, entitled “To Protect and Serve,” was originally one of series of three posts I had written on my first ever blog. I don’t think I will repost the other two posts in the series here because my thoughts in those posts were unorganized, but I intend to revisit those thoughts here eventually.

As you can see, I haven’t updated this blog much this year or much over the past two years, but recent events have compelled me to write something — anything, particularly about law enforcement. As you may know, there have been a few notable murders of Black Americans: Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd. All three incidents have led to a public outcry and Floyd’s murder by four Minneapolis police officers (only one kneeled on Floyd’s neck for over eight minutes, but the other three officers present were complicit) has touched off a series of protests across the United States and around the world.

Before I can even begin to address many of the details of those cases and these protests, I need to first discuss my feelings about the police, which has only been negatively impacted, especially during this past decade. In the meantime, I want to use this text to touch off a conversation about law enforcement, protest, and our relationship with power.

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Famous Sayings #186 — ‘Gentle as a Lamb’

May 4, 2020

David may be a big, strong man but he is as gentle as a lamb with children.

gentle as a lamb, lamb, symbolism, famous sayings
Image by Ben Kerckx from Pixabay

I have been irregular with these posts for the past months, but at least this post comes in a consecutive week. Now, this saying is one I like. While this was meant to be posted in 2019, my schedule got a bit hectic, so I skipped it. But “Gentle as a lamb” was easier to research than many of the other famous sayings in this series.

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Quick PSA: Don’t Drink Bleach, Y’all

dont drink bleach, disinfectants
Bleach is for cleaning, not for your body. Original Image by JeepersMedia via Flickr. (CC by 2.0)

So, if you have been paying at list indirect attention to Donald Trump’s coronavirus press briefings, you may have heard about his suggestion of “injecting” sunlight and even disinfectants (like bleach and Lysol) directly into people’s bodies in order to get rid of the coronavirus.

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Famous Sayings #185 — ‘The Shot Heard ‘Round the World’

April 19, 2020

It was the shot heard ‘round the world

the shot heard round the world, Patriots Day, April 19 1775, American Revolution, Revolutionary War, famous sayings, British, colonial militiamen, minutemen
Image by The National Guard via Flickr. United States Government Work.

It’s been a while since I’ve made a Famous Sayings Post — or any post, for that matter ­— but this installment is connected to April 19. In Maine and Massachusetts, today is Patriots’ Day, the anniversary of a very important event in American history (“Patriots’ Day”). If you’re a history buff, you already know what I’m talking about, but let’s review …

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April 19, 2020

It was the shot heard ‘round the world

the shot heard round the world, Patriots Day, April 19 1775, American Revolution, Revolutionary War, famous sayings, British, colonial militiamen, minutemen
Image by The National Guard via Flickr. United States Government Work.

It’s been a while since I’ve made a Famous Sayings Post — or any post, for that matter ­— but this installment is connected to April 19. In Maine and Massachusetts, today is Patriots’ Day, the anniversary of a very important event in American history (“Patriots’ Day”). If you’re a history buff, you already know what I’m talking about, but let’s review …

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Our Leaders Are Failing Us During This Coronavirus Pandemic

coronavirus, coronavirus pandemic, pandemic, COVID-19, Trump, response, crisis, our leaders
In this image, Trump and Mike Pence can be seen giving a press briefing during a Coronavirus Task Force Meeting on February 29, 2020, in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House. Trump’s administration has provided no real confidence that this country is taking the pandemic seriously. Image provided by The White House via Flickr. (Public Domain)

So … how’s your 2020 going? Not so great, right? I honestly had no expectations for this year beyond meeting a few personal goals, but the coronavirus pandemic (this virus is called COVID-19) has already ruined this year for many. Not only are people dying, but many have either lost their jobs or have been furloughed. They will not have money to pay all their bills or buy essentials to make it past this indefinite crisis period (which could last for at least six months).

Instead of talking about statistics — at least in this post — I wanted to briefly write about what we need from our leaders to stop the spread of the virus and help people recover.

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Famous Sayings #184 — ‘[Beware the] Ides of March’

March 15, 2020

Beware the ides of March.

Vincenzo Camuccini - La morte di Cesare
Vincenzo Camuccini / Public domain

As I was doing research for this famous phrase, I came across this quote in a subheading for one of my sources:

March 15 is known as the Ides of March, which may vaguely remind you of a high school English class.

Indeed, I first heard of this phrase while I was in high school — in the tenth grade to be exact — and after reading a certain play, the phrase has always stuck with me. Thus, when I realized that March 15 fell on a Sunday this year, I decided that this was the phrase I would be looking at on this date. (Note: As I’m typing this, March 16 is approaching …)

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Famous Sayings #183 — ‘Every Tom, Dick, and Harry’

March 14, 2020

Every Tom, Dick, and Harry believes that he can become rich. If everyone were rich, no one would be.

Three men thinking, one wearing a wristwatch
I’m not sure if these men’s names are Tom, Dick, and Harry, but they’re three guys, so … Image cropped. Original photograph by Szilárd Szabó from Pixabay.

This is an interesting expression to look at because it involves three male names that were once very popular. Thy are still common English names because chances are you have met a Tom, Dick, or Harry in your lifetime if you live in an English-speaking country.

Have you used this expression? I don’t believe I have, but I was introduced to it in my childhood.

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Famous Sayings #182 — ‘Wholeheartedly’

March 7, 2020

I agree wholeheartedly.

wholeheartedly, wholehearted, matters of the heart, famous sayings, 19th century

To get started in March, I decided to look at a term originally intended for February on Valentine’s Day to be exact but since I had already found the sources, why not publish it now? Since the post was originally meant for Valentine’s Day, it, of course, concerns a matter of the heart, so to speak.

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Famous Sayings #181 — ‘Leap Year’

February 29, 2020

Since it’s 2020, this year is a leap year.

I decided to cheat a little bit and use a term that is very pertinent to this year: leap year. While looking up the history of this term, I learned some interesting facts about the Gregorian calendar and the Earth’s revolution around the sun.


What Is a ‘Leap Year’?

Of course, a normal year according to the Gregorian calendar is one that lasts 365 days. A leap year has an extra day and generally comes every four years. The extra day, called a leap day, is February 29.

Our calendar year does not perfectly match up with the tropical year, which is the time it takes the Earth to make a full revolution around the sun. The Tropical year is also referred to as the solar year astronomical year, or an equinoctial year. We need to add a leap year every four years so that our calendar can line up with the Earth’s revolution around the sun, otherwise, we would lose about six hours every year and a total of 24 days in a century (“When Is the Next”).

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