5 Ways to Become a Better Leader

This post from According to Greta. really resonated with me because I think about leadership constantly, especially now.


What I Didn’t Like Seeing Early On

As a child, I had a limited amount of experience in the way of leadership … but I had ideas about what I wanted to see in a leader.

I can’t say which trait is most important, but from my experience, I hated favoritism and the unfair delegation of tasks. There were times when I felt that some teammates were receiving preferential treatment. It’s never good to be on the outside looking in. And the worst part is how that translated to receiving tasks.

Also, there were times when the self-appointed leader did not trust the rest of the team. That made us feel inadequate, but also sapped all the fun out of certain projects.

That reminds me: trust is another important component to leadership. Without it, they will be no fair delegation of tasks or any significant progress.


How I See Leadership Today

Now, as a leader, I think these two things are most important for me to be effective: communication, the delegation of tasks, and transparency.

Everyone needs to have good communication. We need to know how things should be done and who should do it. We should also be available to help each other, respond to questions, and get things done in a timely matter.

I want everyone to receive a fair amount of work. That way, everyone can fulfill their duties and we can most the most progress.

I need to be transparent. Teammates need to know what’s going on, how it affects them, and how each process works. People also need to be made aware of any changes to processes.

And there’s another caveat to transparency. As I was recently told, leaders need to lead their subordinates know enough about the leader’s job.

Why? This helps in case of emergency or departures. There will come a time when leadership duties are handed off, so there should be a smooth transition.

Also: If the leader does a good enough job, two good things can happen. First, the next person will be able to seamlessly pick up where the former leader left off. Second, the leader might just be promoted.

That’s something to think about, isn’t it?


BTW…

Regarding the story about the manager: I know how that could be have been handled better.

Sympathy comes first and foremost. When you’re a leader and one of your subordinates has an emergency, you need to make it about them first. Ask them how they’re doing and how much time they think they need and say some comforting words.

Of course, there is a job to do, and you can’t let one worker go MIA. There are tactful ways of saying this along with letting the worker know about their options. Just never say or imply that their concerns are insignificant, especially when it’s a personal or family emergency.

Advertisements